Pre-purchase checklist for a motor home, RV or Travel Trailer

What you need to look for before pre-purchasing a motorhome

Especially when buying a trailer in houston a After you’ve contacted the seller and arranged to view the motorhome, you’ll want to prepare yourself to do an inspection and test drive.

A part of preparing means not getting so emotionally attached to the idea of owning a motorhome that you overlook serious problems with the motorhome you are considering.

This happens far too often. You fall in love with the idea of owning a motorhome, and in your rush to become an owner, you fail to do a proper inspection.

To help you do a pre-purchase inspection, I’ve created a short list of the things to check.

When you go to inspect a motorhome, take these items with you:

  • Notebook and pen
  • Reading glasses
  • Flashlight with fresh batteries
  • Small digital camera
  • Tire pressure gauge with 100 psi range
  • Small mirror – for looking into hard to see places
  • Cotton gloves – to protect your hands
  • Calculator – to add up costs when computing offer
  • Small tool kit, with screwdriver and pliers
  • Rug or blanket – to put on the ground when you climb under the motorhome
  • Refrigerator thermometer

After you arrive on a location to view the motorhome, speak with owner to find a bit about the history of the coach. If there are no red flags in history, ask permission to inspect the motorhome.

When the owner agrees, start with a exterior walk around, checking the following:

  • General condition and curb appeal
  • Accident damage
  • Cracked or broken glass
  • Signs of fluid leaks under the motorhome
  • Missing or broken mirrors
  • Low, flat or bald tires
  • Flaking or cracked paint
  • Cracks in the fiberglass
  • Cracked or missing caulking
  • Sings of rust

If you find serious problems, it may not e worth your time to continue. But if the exterior looks good, it’s time to check the inside of the coach.

As you open the coach door, check to make sure the coach steps extend as they should and work properly. The steps should feel from when you step on them.

On the inside, check the following:

  • General condition of inside furniture and carpet
  • General condition of interior ceiling covering 0 look for discoloration and water spots
  • Any unusual odors (pet, food, smoke, mildew)
  • Signs of water intrusion – look for water spots
  • Soft spots in the floor
  • Condition of windows, curtains and screens
  • Couch, any unusual water or spotting on fabric, firmness of cushions
  • Condition of dinette (if applicable)
  • Wear and tear of counter, sink, faucets
  • Overhead cabinets – open each to check if hinges work properly and to see condition of side walls within cabinets
  • Location and size of bathroom – note whether it is a dry bath or wet bath
  • Condition of toilet – It should be securely mounted in floor, no soft spots around it
  • Condition and size of shower – check shower pan for soft spots (indication of rotten floor)
  • Location of sleeping areas – check to make sure bed is wide and long enough for your needs

If all the above check out OK, continue your inspection by testing the mechanicals of the coach.

To check mechanicals:

  • Test the generator – It should start easily and run without any stumbling. Run it with the coach air conditioner set to high so you can see how it handles a load.
  • Test the refrigerator – place a thermometer in the fridge and let it adjust to interior temp. Fridge should be 38 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Freezer should be 10 degrees Fahrenheit or lower.
  • Test the plumbing system – turn the water pump on the flush the toilet. Run both hot and cold water in sinks. Look around toilet and under sinks for signs of leaks. Water pump should turn off a few seconds after you turn off faucets.
  • Test the electrical system – try all light switches, exhaust fans, air conditioning, microwave, TV, and stereo system.
  • Test the control panel – check to see that it shows all system and tank levels. Check that each panel switch operates properly.
  • Test the propane stove – look for signs of rust under stove grates, then light each burner to make sure they all work.
  • Test the refrigerator in propane mode – it should light easily and have no broken springs.
  • Check that interior windows open easily and screens are in good condition.
  • If there is a slide room, run the slide out to make sure it moves without problems.

If all the above checks out okay, it’s time to check the motorhome running gear.

Do this by:

  • Sit in the driver’s seat and adjust as needed.
  • If the seat has power adjustments, test that they work.
  • If steering wheel is adjustable, test that it works.
  • Start the motor. It should start easily. Check side mirror to see if signs of smoke from exhaust. There shouldn’t be any.
  • Leave the motor running while you do other checks.
  • Check that all the dash gauges are operational.
  • Check that power windows roll up and down without problems.
  • Check that power door locks work.
  • Check that dash air conditioning cools down quickly.
  • Check the horn.
  • Operate left and right turn signals. (It helps to have an assistant outside to confirm the lights are working in tandem with the dashboard.)
  • Check head and running lights.
  • With foot on brake, put motorhome in gear. Listen for unusual noises. Put back in park. Make sure parking brake is set.
  • Step outside of coach and listen to motor. There should be no unusual noises.

If there are no problems, it is time to check fluid levels and condition of the tires.

  • Turn the motor off.
  • Use the hood release to open the hood. Look for smoke or oil engine or signs of improper repairs.
  • Pull oil dip stick and check condition and color of oil, using a paper towel.
  • Look at levels of brake fluid.
  • Check general condition of belts.
  • Check under coach for fluids (air conditioner water drip is to be expected).

Since it is unlikely that you’ll have the expertise to do a full mechanical check of the motor and transmission, if you have concerns or if the coach has high mileage, you may want to get it checked by a local mechanic.

Checking tires

Check the general conditions of the tires. There should be plenty of tread left, and no cracking along the sidewalks.

To check the build date of the tire, look for a 4 digit number on the tire sidewall. The first two digits indicate the week the tires were

Manufactured, and the next two digits will be the year.

If you find a code that looks like:

LMLR 5107

It means the tire was built in the 51st week of 2007.

If the date code shows the tire is more than five years old, it is time to replace the tires, no matter how much tread is showing.

If tires need to be replaced, make a note and be sure to factor this in while negotiating a sales price.

Road testing

If you’re satisfied with the general condition of a coach and have found no deal killers or mechanical problems, it’s time for a road test – but only if you are still interested in the coach.

If you aren’t interested in it, don’t waste the seller’s time and fuel by taking a test drive. Just thank the seller for his time and leave.

But if you are seriously interested, take a test drive.

When I do a road test, I usually ask the seller to drive for the first few miles while I sit in the passenger seat.

This gives me a chance to see how the coach rides without being distracted by the challenge of driving an unfamiliar vehicle.

This also gives me a chance to hear any unusual sounds, and see how well the current owner treats the vehicle as he drives.

Be sure to do the test with the radio or sound system turned off!

After the seller has driven a few miles, I’ll ask for a chance to drive.

When I drive, I’ll start on back streets so I can familiarize myself with the handling and braking characteristics of the coach.

If this part of the drive goes well, and I’m still interested in the coach, I’ll ask owner if we can take it out on the highway.

If he doesn’t agree, I’ll pass on the deal right then.

But if he does agree, we’ll go out onto the highway and see how well the coach handles at 65mph.

Ideally, it should handle well, not wander around the road, and not be easily disturbed by passing trucks.

On the highway, be sure to test the cruise control. It should be easy to set, and should hold set speed without problems.

Drive on the highway for at least five minutes, and learn if driving requires the two-handed ‘grip of death’ on the wheel, or if the coach can easily be driven one handed.

After leaving the highway, check behind for traffic, then test the brakes. Then head back to the seller’s location.

If at this point all has gone well, and if I’m interested, I’ll begin negotiating the price.

Here Are Some Videos For Additional Information

Buying A Motorhome or RV or Travel Trailer from the right person

Just as important as buying the right motorhome, is buying from the right person.

When it comes to the right person, the perfect seller is:

  • An older person, usually retired, who purchased his motorhome new, and who currently owes nothing on it and has clear title.
  • This perfect seller has taken meticulous care of the motorhome throughout his life, and has kept the service up-to-date.
  • The perfect seller drives the motorhome at least once every two weeks, keeps the batteries charged, and makes sure all the systems are operating properly.
  • This perfect seller is usually facing a change in his life, and the motorhome no longer fits in.

He’s either gotten too old to drive, has no reason to travel, or is moving to a new home where he is not able to store the motorhome and is selling for that reason.

  • This perfect seller doesn’t trust doing business on eBay, has been given an embarrassingly low ball offer from a dealer, and is advertising his motorhome locally in the newspapers, or on the local Craigslist.

In essence, the perfect seller has a great condition motorhome, has clear title, and has a good reason for needing to sell the motorhome quickly.

So you’re thinking this “perfect seller” sounds like a fantasy, right?

But you’d be wrong.

I’ve bought several motorhomes from people who meet this description.

Most of these people have retired to Florida, bought a motorhome upon retirement, used it for several years, and now are no longer able to continue to live the motorhome lifestyle.

These people are not found just in Florida though. You can find them in other retirement areas as well, including many southern states, especially Arizona and Texas.

Not only are these southern retirees perfect sellers, their motorhomes are outside the rust belt states – which usually means their motorhomes are rust free and haven’t suffered severe winter weather.

No matter how difficult you think it might be, it is definitely worth your while to look for sellers like these.

Sellers to avoid

Just as these are perfect sellers to but from, there are certain kinds of sellers you’ll want to avoid.

These include:

  • People who owe more on the motorhome than it’s worth. They’ll try to sell their motorhome for at least their loan payoff amount, which is often many thousands more than the retail value of their motorhome.

These people are “upside down”, and there’s not much you can do for them – unless you want to pay more than the motorhome is worth – and I don’t advise doing that!

  • People who have lived in their motorhome full time – especially in disaster situations (after hurricanes), floods, tornadoes, etc).

Living full time in a motorhome can quickly wear out the interior components, leave cooking and other odors, and result in moisture problems from condensation (breathing and showers).

You really don’t want a motorhome that has been a permanent camp for disaster survivors.

  • People who sell repo, flood damaged, theft recovery and salvage the motorhomes.

Never buy a salvage title or flood damaged motorhome – it’ll cost you a lot of trouble and money. And when it comes time to sell, you won’t find many buyers.

  • People who have travelled with lots of unruly children. While some children are well behaved angels, some are not.

They can flush scissors down the holding tanks(true story), hide gummy bears in the walls, throw up on the furniture – and do other things that leave smells, stains and problems you really don’t want to deal with.

  • People who smoke – you’ll never get the smell of tobacco smoke out of a motorhome. And unless you can find someone to sell it to who also smokes, you’ll have a hard time when you try to resell.
  • Dealers who price their unused far above retail and won’t budge on the price. Most dealers price motorhomes $10,000 above retail, and unless you know how the game works, you’ll overpay.
  • People who know nothing about the motorhome they are selling. Often they’ll be selling for a relative or a friend, and can’t tell you anything about the history or problems of the unit they are selling.

In some cases this can work in your favor. But you’ll be buying blind – with no history of use or any other details from the previous owners.

  • Craigslist scammers who list motorhomes they don’t own. They’ll email you a very convincing story about being in Iraq and the motorhome is stored at a military base.

If you pay their low price, they’ll give you directions to the motorhome. But it is a scam. The motorhome doesn’t exist, and they’ll end up with your money.

As a general rule, if a Craigslist motorhome ad doesn’t include a phone number, it is a scam.

As you can see, there are a lot of people you probably don’t want to buy motorhomes from. And that’s why taking the time to find the perfect seller can be worth the trouble.

Even if it means you have to travel to Florida, finding the perfect seller with the right motorhome is usually worth it.

Related to this, I have a friend who lives in Oregon who travels to Florida to buy motorhomes he takes back to Oregon where he sells for a substantial profit.

Even when factoring in the cost of travel, he can typically make $10,000 profit on motorhomes he brings back to the west coast.

That’s because motorhomes generally sell for quite a bit more on the west coast than they do in Florida.

Buying at the right price

Now that you’ve learned about buying the right kind of motorhome or trailer from the right kind of seller, you’ll want to know about buying at the right price.

So how do you come up with the right price for any particular model motorhome?

It starts with doing research and learning what similar models of motorhomes have recently sold for.

For example, if you are interested in buying a 2006 Winnebago View Class B+, you’d want to start by seeing what these have recently sold for on eBay.

You’re interested in the actual selling price on eBay, not the asking price of units that didn’t sell or didn’t get any bids.

To d this, visit eBay, log into your account, and search for Winnebago View” in eBay motors.

When the results show up, look in the left hand column, find the ‘search option’ category, and click the ‘completed listings’ link.

This will show recent completed auctions for the item you searched for.

Look for auctions that actually ended with a sale, and you’ll get a good idea of the real world value of that particular model of motorhome.

But that’s not necessarily the price you would want to pay.

When I’m buying, I want to pay less than what similar units are actually selling for on eBay.

That gives me confidence that if for some reason I don’t like the coach and decide to resell quickly, I can get all or most of my money back by listing it on eBay.

But the only way to know what a specific model of coach would sell for on eBay, is to search eBay before you make an offer.

And doing that search before you can even call about a particular motorhome is part of the process of getting a good price.

In addition to finding out what similar models are selling for on eBay, I always search to see if there are lower priced units available on Craigslist.

To do this, I use http://www.searchtempest.com/ to do a nationwide search on Craigslist for the model of motorhome I’m looking for.

The search results will show the price variations from region by region and state by state.

You’ll likely discover that asking prices are quite a bit lower in place like Florida than the Pacific Coast (California, Oregon & Washington).

Sort through the listings that interest you, and you’ll start seeing a pattern of price trends.

Knowing these trends will help you come up with what you consider to be a good price for the coach you want.

Getting more out of Craigslist

Because I use Craigslist to do a lot of research, I’ve found tools to help me use Craigslist better.

One of these is Craigslist Helper – a free add-on for Firefox, Chrome and Safari web browsers.

With Craigslist helper installed, the Craigslist pages show photos of every item listed – without the need of clicking on each ad.

Seeing these photos makes it easy to quickly scan hundreds of listings, and pinpoint the ones that interest you.

To find the free Craigslist Helper, go to http://ziink.com/ and scroll down until you see the install link for your browser.

Staying within your budget

Most motorhome buyers will want to set a maximum amount to spend before they begin their search.

The good news is no matter how low your maximum amount is, you should be able to find a decent motorhome to fit your budget.

For example, I recently purchased a nice Class B+ motorhome from a retired ‘perfect seller’ who had grown too old to drive.

He told me I was the only one who had responded to his local newspaper ad, even though his asking price was $13,500 – he agreed to sell to me for $7,500.

See Videos About Buying Motorhomes Below For Additional Information


Buying the right motorhome

After buying and selling motorhomes for several years, I’ve learned that the right motorhome to buy is the kind of motorhome people with money will want to buy when you get ready to sell it.

That kind of thinking drives my wife crazy.

She tells me, “Why worry about who will want it when you get ready to sell it? Get one you’ll enjoy now and don’t worry so much about selling it later on.”

And she’s probably right.

You should get a motorhome you’ll enjoy now- unless of course, you don’t plan to keep it forever.

In that case, it does pay to think ahead and consider how difficult it will be to sell when you decide to upgrade to a different one.

In my case, I know I’m only going to keep a motorhome for a year or so. Then I’ll get the urge to sell it and look for another one. There are always trailers for sale in Houston. In fact there are many enclosed trailers for sale in Houston TX. Fema trailer sales in Houston are always on the increase.

So when I start looking at motorhomes, I try to buy the right one– one that people with money will want to buy when I get ready to sell it.

This usually means a motorhome that:

  • Is a 2000 model or newer – newer motorhomes will have newer technology. More reliable and more fuel efficient engines and transmissions. And up-to-date safety features. Plus modern fixtures and appliances.

And from a psychological point of view, it’s a whole lot easier to sell something with 20 in front of the year model rather than 19.

  • Has less than 35,000 miles – while most motorhomes can easily do 100,000 miles before major mechanical work is needed, getting one with fewer than 35,000 miles usually means it can go longer before major service is required.

And with lower initial miles, you can drive it ten or fifteen thousand miles, and it’ll still be a low mileage motorhome when you get ready to sell.

  • Has more than 10,000 miles – motorhomes that have suspiciously low miles often mean the motorhome was so difficult to drive that the owner was afraid to drive it, and just parked it.

And motorhomes that have been parked and unused will almost always require expensive service to get all the parts working again.

This service can include replacing fuel pumps, belts, batteries, tires, brakes, and a carb rebuild on the generator.

I’ve been through this process with a motorhome that sat unused for two years. And it was expensive. I located it

I’d rather buy a motorhome the previous owner drove often and far enough that he found ant defects or problems, and fixed them early on.

  • Has great curl appeal – I tend to buy motorhomes that have great curl appeal. Even though they may be ten years old, they often look new, and tend to attract serious interest from people who want to buy a motorhome.

On more than one occasion I’ve been approached in Walmart parking lots by people who wanted to talk to me about my motorhome and ask if I would be interested in selling it.

That’s the kind of motorhome I like owning. The kind that attract buyers- even when it’s not for sale! I always find motorhomes like those – especially the enclosed trailers that are selling in Houston TX.

  • Is from a manufacturer with a good reputation – Winnebago, Fleetwood, RoadTrek, Pleasureway, Leisure Travel, Coachhouse, etc.

Avoid motorhomes from manufacturers you’ve never heard of, or who have bad reputations (see the chapter in this book but doing research on brands).

  • Is extremely clean inside – the condition of the interior of a motorhome can tell you a lot about how it’s been used and taken care of.

If the interior is dirty, smells bad, has spots on the carpets or damage to walls and woodwork, you can be sure the motorhome hasn’t been taken care of.

If the inside is clean and looks fresh, it usually means the owner took pride in keeping the motorhome maintained.

  • Has no body damage – the condition of the exterior of the motorhome also tells you a lot.

If there are dents, scratches, missing parts, cracked windows, doors that don’t open, panels that don’t line up – you can be certain there are problems with the coach.

If the owner hasn’t bothered to take care of the outside, he probably hasn’t kept up with the required service and maintenance of the running gear, and that could mean expensive repairs ahead.

  • Has no rust – rust can be a serious problem, especially in Class B camping vans that have mostly metal bodies. If a motorhome has serious visible rust, it probably has more that you can’t see. Just walk away.
  • Has manufacturer’s book and manuals – having the books and manuals for a motorhome makes it easier to learn how to operate the systems in the motorhome. And those books and manuals make it easier to sell the motorhome later on.
  • Is the kind of motorhome people want to buy right now – the demand for specific types of motorhomes changes over time. For a long time, the larger Class A motorhomes were the most sought after.

But these days, it is difficult to sell a used Class A motorhome.

Same is true with Class C’s. At one time, they were very much in demand. But not so much these days.

Right now, the highest demand is for Class B and class B+ motorhomes.

And if that’s what others want to buy, that’s what I want to own.

My opinion on buying the right home

In my opinion, the best motorhome to buy right now if you plan to resell it later on, is a ten-year-old or newer Class B or Class B+ with 40,000 or fewer miles on it.

The problem with this strategy is so many people are looking for a Class B’s and B+’s, that finding older ones with good prices has become a challenge. But they can be found, and I’ll show you how in a later chapter.

If you are on a tighter budget, and need something larger than a Class B or B+, there are plenty of Class C’s available at bargain prices.

Same is true with Class A’s. There are some real bargains out there. Some great travel trailers are for sale in Houston TX.

But when it comes time to resell, the Class B’s and B+’s will be the ones that sell the quickest and retain their value the longest. They have the highest fema trailer sales in Houston.

Which Motor Home or RV class is best for you?

On paper, when you compare all the advantages / disadvantages of the different classes of motorhomes, it would look like Class C motorhomes would have the most going for them.

The Class C’s have more room inside than a Class B, are easier to drive than a Class A, and are significantly less expensive than either Class A or Class B motorhomes of similar model years. And because there are plenty of used Class C’s on the market, you can usually find a great deal on one without much trouble. In fact, you can often purchase a brand new or slightly used Class C for half or even a third of the price of a smaller Class B ‘camping van’ or B+. But a Class C motorhome may not be the best choice for everyone. They do have their disadvantages, including rapid price depreciation and potential for water leaks around the seams.

How about a Class B? If you are looking for something easy to drive, that can be parked just about anywhere, a Class B might be a good choice. But only if you don’t mind having very cramped quarters, a small bathroom and limited storage space. The Class B vans do look sleek and stylish on the outside, and can attract admiring looks from just about everyone – especially from owners of larger motorhomes. But in return for the smaller size and sleek looks of the Class B, you give up a lot of space inside. In a Class B, the bathrooms are very compact, often smaller than even the most cramped airline bathroom.

And more often than not, you have to ‘assemble’ the bathroom to use it. Usually by pulling sections of it away from the wall. Sleeping areas will be sparse, with narrow or short couches that fold into a bed. And don’t expect much room to store your gear or your bedding. If you’re taller than six feet, plus-sized, or travel with a companion, you’re definitely going to feel cramped in most Class B’s. Still, for some people, a Class B is the perfect choice.

Maybe a B+? If you like the smaller size of the Class B, but want more inside room, a real bathroom, more storage space, without the boxy look of a Class C, a Class B+ may be exactly what you need.

In the B+ you get the sleek aerodynamic styling of the Class B in a coach that is slightly wider and a bit longer than a camping van.

Inside, your choices can run from the spartan look of an older Trail-lite or Chinook, to the more luxurious appointments of a CoachHouse Platinum. A Class B+ is the perfect choice for those who want more room than a camping van, but don’t want to manhandle a boxy truck-like Class C down the highway.

The great combination of small outside size with a surprisingly large interior feel, has resulted in Class B+’s becoming the current most sought out motorhome style. As a result of this demand, resale values of Class B+’s remain high. Still, if you know what to look for and where to look, you can find really good condition older model Class B+ units for $12,000 and up.

Maybe a Class A?

If you are looking for a motorhome you can live in for months on end, or even full time, a Class A motorhome might be in your future. Many Class A motorhomes are built with the full time resident in mind, and are designed to have the features of an upscale condo. You’ll find large double-door refrigerators, large kitchens with a pantry, bathrooms with showers – even clothes washer/dryers! You’ll usually sleep more comfortably in a Class A, due to quiet zoned heating and air, and king or queen size beds.

You’ll also find cavernous amounts of storage, with cedar lined closets, his and her dressers, overhead cabinets, and huge basement storage in the outside compartments. And as expected, most Class A’s have multiple flat screen TVs, elaborate entertainment systems, and are a joy to spend time in. With all these amenities, you’d expect Class A motorhomes to be expensive. And they are – if you purchase a new one. But buying used, you can often find top-of-the-line units with low miles for under $25,000. And you can find older, less luxurious, models with prices starting around $10,000. In later chapters, I’ll show you how to find these great deals on Class A motorhomes.

What to Choose?

When it comes to choosing the right class of motorhome, only you can decide what will be best for your own needs.

But just in case you’re wondering, here is my opinion: For two adults traveling without children, a Class B+ is a great choice. Easy to drive, easy to park, ideal for day trips and room for two people.

For a family on a budget, a Class C is a good choice. More sleeping areas, more storage room, dedicated dining area, larger kitchen and bath. Easy to drive, relatively easy to maintain, and least expensive to purchase.

For upscale travel on long trips with extended stays, a Class A can be a good choice. Much more room inside, nicer bathroom(s) and bedrooms, luxury amenities, and basement storage areas. A bit more challenging to drive and park, plus you will need to tow a second vehicle or be prepared to hike, bike or rent cars to get around.

For one person traveling alone, or a couple who don’t mind sharing cramped quarters, a Class B might be right. Especially if looking for something to use as a second vehicle. Not recommended for extended camping or for more than two people.

Advantages / Disadvantages of each class

Now, that we’ve covered the basic motorhome classes, let’s take a look at the advantages and disadvantages of each class of motorhome. Advantages of Class A As mentioned earlier, the Class A’s are the larger, ‘rolling palace’ bus style motorhomes.

Being larger, Class A motorhomes typically have:

  • more room inside
  • larger kitchens
  • larger bathroom and shower
  • more sleeping areas
  • more storage areas
  • more towing capacity
  • larger fuel tank
  • larger holding tanks
  • multiple slide rooms
  • larger generator
  • ducted heat and air

If traveling with a number of people, or planning to stay at a single location for a long period of time, a Class A motorhome can be a good choice.

Disadvantages of Class A

There are some disadvantages to owning a large Class A motorhome. These include:

  • More difficult to drive on small roads, parking lots, crowded city streets
  • More difficult to find places to park, more difficult to get into gas stations, shopping centers
  • Won’t be able to park in some national parks and camp grounds that have size restrictions Lower fuel mileage (7 to 9 mpg is typical)
  • Due to more systems and features, higher maintenance costs
  • More expensive tires (to replace a full set of tires on a Class A can cost several thousand dollars)
  • Due to limited parking space or zoning restrictions you may not be able to store at your home. This would mean paying to store elsewhere
  • You may want a tow vehicle so that when you reach your camp site, you have another vehicle to drive to local attractions
  • Resale value of Class A motorhomes can drop quickly

With all these disadvantages, you might think I would recommended against buying a Class A motorhome. And in many cases I would. But depending on your needs and budget, a Class A might be the perfect choice for you. And since prices of used Class A motorhomes have fallen so dramatically, it is possible to find some amazing deals – as long as you know what to look for (we’ll cover that in later chapters).

If you do want one of these rolling palaces, be sure to drive one in traffic and on the highway before you get in too deep. You may discover it’s more than you can handle. Or you may find it fits your driving style perfectly. Class B Class B motorhomes are the small camping van motorhomes that are quite popular these days with empty nesters traveling without children.

Advantages of a Class B motorhome

  • easy to park easy to
  • drive easy to maneuver on tight city streets, mall parking lots, sports events
  • better fuel mileage
  • will fit in almost all campgrounds
  • ‘stealth camping’ a possibility
  • low maintenance costs
  • can be repaired at most auto repair
  • shops retain resell value longer
  • can be used as a second car

Disadvantages

  • very limited space inside
  • very small bathroom
  • very small kitchen
  • little or no storage areas
  • limited sleeping area, narrow or short beds
  • tight headroom – not for tall people
  • limited access, duck your head to get in
  • no slide room
  • no leveling jacks
  • expensive to buy

Even with all these disadvantages, Class B motorhomes are the most popular today. Especially the ones built on the Mercedes Sprinter chassis with the diesel motor because they get such high fuel mileage.

Because Class B’s are so popular and because they can be used as second vehicles, they retain very high resale value. Even units 15 years old can demand higher prices than larger, newer and more luxurious Class A motorhomes. Still, due to the very limited interior space, Class B motorhomes are not the best choice for all, especially those traveling with more than two people. But if you have your heart set on a Class B motorhome, the good news is you can find older ones in very good condition starting at around $12,000. In a later chapter, I’ll show you where to look to find these deals.

Advantages / Disadvantages – Class C

Class C motorhomes fit about half-way between the large size of Class A motorhomes, and the small camping van size of Class B’s. Due to the larger interiors, Class C’s are quite popular – especially for families traveling together.

Advantages of a Class C

  • Much more interior room than a Class B camping van
  • easier to drive, easier to park than Class A
  • larger bathroom than Class B
  • larger kitchen than Class B
  • more sleeping areas than Class B
  • more storage areas than Class B
  • lower cost of maintenance than Class A
  • slightly better fuel mileage than Class A
  • often have one or more slide rooms
  • engine and transmission can be repaired by most auto shops
  • lower cost to purchase, new or used

Disadvantages

  • Cab overhanging bunk area decreases aerodynamics
  • Fuel mileage typically 9 to 11 mpg
  • Handles like a large truck, can be stiff riding
  • Can be difficult to drive in windy conditions
  • Older units are prone to water leaks along overhead cab seams
  • Longer units can experience handling problems
  • lower resale value than Class B’s

While the Class C doesn’t have the sexy curb appeal of a Class A or Class B due to their boxy styling, they do have plenty of room inside for a family, and after minor suspension upgrades can handle well on the road. And because Class C motorhomes have lower resale value and very fast depreciation, there are many opportunities to purchase late model Class C’s with low mileage at very attractive prices. If you’re interested in a used Class C, you should be able to find older ones in excellent condition for under $10,000, and brand new ones starting at $45,000.

Advantages / Disadvantages – Class B+ Class B+ motorhomes are actually Class Cs without the overhanging cab bunk area. And because they are essentially Class C’s, they have the same advantages / disadvantages of a Class C, except in one area.

Because Class B+ motorhomes do away with the cab-over bunk area, the Class B+ is more aerodynamic, which results in slightly better fuel mileage and easier handling in winds.

Another advantage of doing away with the overhead bunk is the elimination of a major source of water leaks and wind noise found in Class C motorhomes. But doing away with the overhead bunk area means less storage space and fewer sleeping areas. Perhaps the biggest disadvantage of Class B+ motorhomes is their price. They are usually priced quite a bit higher than Class Cs, because of better build quality and high consumer demand. Because they are among the ‘most wanted’ motorhomes, Class B+’s tend to hold their resale value longer than Class A’s or Class C’s. If you have your heart set on a Class B+, you should be able to find older ones in good condition for prices starting just over $12,000. For really nice newer ones, prices start in the mid $30,000’s.

Different Types of Motor Homes or RVs – Advantages and Disadvantages

Motorhome types

As you begin your search for the perfect motorhome, you’ll immediately discover that motorhomes are categorized into three distinct classes. These class identifiers relate to the way motorhomes are constructed, and are used to quickly identify the general size and features you can expect in each motorhome class.

Almost all motorhome sellers and dealers will list their motorhomes by these classes, and it’s important for you to know what the different classes are, and what they mean in terms of size, price and drivability. So let’s get started by defining the different motorhome classifications. Class A – the larger bus style motorhomes built on commercial truck chassis. Class A motorhomes are the rolling palaces of motorhomes. They typically have the amenities of a small upscale apartment, full size appliances (even a washer and dryer), and often have multiple slide rooms.

Class A Motorhome

A Class A can range in length from 25 feet to 45 feet. And they are wider than you might think.

class-A-travel-trailer-or-motorhome

 

 

 

 

 

Class C

These are mid sized motorhomes built on cut-away van or truck chassis, typically the size and shape of rental moving trucks. A distinguishing feature of the Class C motorhome or ‘recreational vehicle’ is the bunk compartment over the drivers cab area.

Four Winds Class C motorhome

Class C motorhome or travel trailer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class C motorhomes range in size from 22 feet to over 30 feet, and are typically designed and furnished to meet the needs of the family traveling with small children. Class B – the smallest motorhomes, created from a standard passenger or work van. Sometimes referred to as a ‘camping van’.

Class B Motorhome

class B motorhome or travel trailers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class B motorhomes appeal to those who want something small enough to park anywhere, yet with a kitchen, bath and sleeping area. Fairly cramped inside, they are best for one person traveling alone or a couple that get along well. Class B+ – similar to a Class C motorhome, but without the bunk area over the cab. The Class B+ usually has a more aerodynamic shape, a sleeker design, a more upscale interior, and get better fuel mileage than a Class C.

The Class B+ is wider, taller, can have slide rooms, and has much more room inside than a Class B camping van

Class B+ motor home

 

 

 

 

Advantages / Disadvantages of each class

Now, that we’ve covered the basic motorhome classes, let’s take a look at the advantages and disadvantages of each class of motorhome. Advantages of Class A As mentioned earlier, the Class A’s are the larger, ‘rolling palace’ bus style motorhomes.

Being larger, Class A motorhomes typically have:

  • more room inside
  • larger kitchens
  • larger bathroom and shower
  • more sleeping areas
  • more storage areas
  • more towing capacity
  • larger fuel tank
  • larger holding tanks
  • multiple slide rooms
  • larger generator
  • ducted heat and air

If traveling with a number of people, or planning to stay at a single location for a long period of time, a Class A motorhome can be a good choice.

Disadvantages of Class A

There are some disadvantages to owning a large Class A motorhome. These include:

  • More difficult to drive on small roads, parking lots, crowded city streets
  • More difficult to find places to park, more difficult to get into gas stations, shopping centers
  • Won’t be able to park in some national parks and camp grounds that have size restrictions Lower fuel mileage (7 to 9 mpg is typical)
  • Due to more systems and features, higher maintenance costs
  • More expensive tires (to replace a full set of tires on a Class A can cost several thousand dollars)
  • Due to limited parking space or zoning restrictions you may not be able to store at your home. This would mean paying to store elsewhere
  • You may want a tow vehicle so that when you reach your camp site, you have another vehicle to drive to local attractions
  • Resale value of Class A motorhomes can drop quickly

With all these disadvantages, you might think I would recommended against buying a Class A motorhome. And in many cases I would. But depending on your needs and budget, a Class A might be the perfect choice for you. And since prices of used Class A motorhomes have fallen so dramatically, it is possible to find some amazing deals – as long as you know what to look for (we’ll cover that in later chapters).

If you do want one of these rolling palaces, be sure to drive one in traffic and on the highway before you get in too deep. You may discover it’s more than you can handle. Or you may find it fits your driving style perfectly. Class B Class B motorhomes are the small camping van motorhomes that are quite popular these days with empty nesters traveling without children.

Advantages of a Class B motorhome

  • easy to park easy to
  • drive easy to maneuver on tight city streets, mall parking lots, sports events
  • better fuel mileage
  • will fit in almost all campgrounds
  • ‘stealth camping’ a possibility
  • low maintenance costs
  • can be repaired at most auto repair
  • shops retain resell value longer
  • can be used as a second car

Disadvantages

  • very limited space inside
  • very small bathroom
  • very small kitchen
  • little or no storage areas
  • limited sleeping area, narrow or short beds
  • tight headroom – not for tall people
  • limited access, duck your head to get in
  • no slide room
  • no leveling jacks
  • expensive to buy

Even with all these disadvantages, Class B motorhomes are the most popular today. Especially the ones built on the Mercedes Sprinter chassis with the diesel motor because they get such high fuel mileage.

Because Class B’s are so popular and because they can be used as second vehicles, they retain very high resale value. Even units 15 years old can demand higher prices than larger, newer and more luxurious Class A motorhomes. Still, due to the very limited interior space, Class B motorhomes are not the best choice for all, especially those traveling with more than two people. But if you have your heart set on a Class B motorhome, the good news is you can find older ones in very good condition starting at around $12,000. In a later chapter, I’ll show you where to look to find these deals.

Advantages / Disadvantages – Class C

Class C motorhomes fit about half-way between the large size of Class A motorhomes, and the small camping van size of Class B’s. Due to the larger interiors, Class C’s are quite popular – especially for families traveling together.

Advantages of a Class C

  • Much more interior room than a Class B camping van
  • easier to drive, easier to park than Class A
  • larger bathroom than Class B
  • larger kitchen than Class B
  • more sleeping areas than Class B
  • more storage areas than Class B
  • lower cost of maintenance than Class A
  • slightly better fuel mileage than Class A
  • often have one or more slide rooms
  • engine and transmission can be repaired by most auto shops
  • lower cost to purchase, new or used

Disadvantages

  • Cab overhanging bunk area decreases aerodynamics
  • Fuel mileage typically 9 to 11 mpg
  • Handles like a large truck, can be stiff riding
  • Can be difficult to drive in windy conditions
  • Older units are prone to water leaks along overhead cab seams
  • Longer units can experience handling problems
  • lower resale value than Class B’s

While the Class C doesn’t have the sexy curb appeal of a Class A or Class B due to their boxy styling, they do have plenty of room inside for a family, and after minor suspension upgrades can handle well on the road. And because Class C motorhomes have lower resale value and very fast depreciation, there are many opportunities to purchase late model Class C’s with low mileage at very attractive prices. If you’re interested in a used Class C, you should be able to find older ones in excellent condition for under $10,000, and brand new ones starting at $45,000.

Advantages / Disadvantages – Class B+ Class B+ motorhomes are actually Class Cs without the overhanging cab bunk area. And because they are essentially Class C’s, they have the same advantages / disadvantages of a Class C, except in one area.

Because Class B+ motorhomes do away with the cab-over bunk area, the Class B+ is more aerodynamic, which results in slightly better fuel mileage and easier handling in winds.

Another advantage of doing away with the overhead bunk is the elimination of a major source of water leaks and wind noise found in Class C motorhomes. But doing away with the overhead bunk area means less storage space and fewer sleeping areas. Perhaps the biggest disadvantage of Class B+ motorhomes is their price. They are usually priced quite a bit higher than Class Cs, because of better build quality and high consumer demand. Because they are among the ‘most wanted’ motorhomes, Class B+’s tend to hold their resale value longer than Class A’s or Class C’s. If you have your heart set on a Class B+, you should be able to find older ones in good condition for prices starting just over $12,000. For really nice newer ones, prices start in the mid $30,000’s.

Here Are Some Video Reviews of Different Types of Motor Homes. Enjoy

Trailer History, Parts, Pros and Cons

Travel Trailer History

Travel trailers are usually attached to and towed behind vehicle to afford a residence to rest which is more usually comfortable and safer than a tent. Similar what you see in movies when you see enclosed travel trailers. These heavy duty equipment provide a wat for people to basically carry their own home on a vacation without depend on a hotel and also empowers them to visit various places. In some countries though, campers are restricted to chosen sites for which you have to pay fees.

These travellers vary from basic ones which may be a little more than a tent on some wheels to those bigger ones that contain numerous rooms with all the equipment and furnishings of a normal home. These are used in many parts of the USA like Houston Texas which is like a mecca for these stuff, and all around the world like New Zealand, Europe and Canada.

In the States and in Canada the history of travel trailers can be easily traced back to early 1920s when the people who enjoyed the use were frequently referred to as “ the tin can tourists”. However as some time elapsed, the trailers became more a bit civilized and received a new title in the 1930s and 1940 which was now the house trailer. In the 1950s & 1960s the industry appeared to split creating the two types that we end up seeing today that are of the recreational vehicle (RV) industry and mobile home business. Today they mainly are categorised as some type of RV along with motorhomes and fifth wheel trailers also pop-up trailers and then the popular truck campers.

In the United States it is largely illegal for travellers to journey in a trailer while it is in motion unlike the horse-drawn ones and coaches. Triple towing ( which is towing two trailers) is not permitted in many states,  like California in Alabama, Florida or New York; however though, triple towing is permitted in Texas if the joint length does not surpass 65 feet (which is 20 m).

The off-road trailers that are also called 4×4 trailer, and jeep trailers are built precisely for discovering the thrilling outback country areas without the restrictions of a paved highway or gravel roads. These are intended to handle extreme terrains. Many of the off-road ones are equipped with a tent, a bed, a skid plate, some large tires, some lift kits, and a articulation system . Innovations in the trailer types are the “toy haulers” also called “the toy box”. Having some half living spaces and some half garages these allow your ‘toys’ to be carried to the countryside. The fifth-wheelers are supported by a hitch in the midpoint of the bed of the pickup truck in its place of a hitch at the back of an automobile. A special hitch used for fifth-wheels is a lesser type of the one used on the 18-wheeler trucks and can be connected by simply driving the tow truck under the trailer. The fifth wheel trailers are popular with permanent recreational vehicle fanatics who often reside in them for numerous months in a single place using their truck tow automobile for native errands. A fifth wheeler tows more steadily than a old-style travel trailer because the hitch weight sits down right over the pickup truck’s back tires. So since a part of a fifth wheel sits right over the bed of the pickup it also decreases the overall length of the automobile and trailer combination while permitting the equivalent room as a comparable length system.

In addition the hitch’s position in the pickup’s bed lessens the risk of jack-knifing and thus allows for extra manoeuvrability when backing up. However because of the larger room available on the roads in the United Sates, some of these automobiles are easily more prevalent in the US and Canada than in the European countries or other areas of the world.

Pros and Cons 

Holiday travels are thrilling, and that is particularly accurate if one’s journey’s end is the country side. Not everyone will however share this eagerness. People who have grown too comfortable with their homes for example may find traveling very depressing.

However traveling does not always mean departing one’s adored home behind. And that is a possibility by utilising a travel trailer.

They, also often called caravans in many places outside the U.S., are small trailers that can be used as living quarters while traveling. Travel trailers are actually a part of a large family of vehicles having the same characteristics. Also belonging to this group of vehicles are the pop-up trailers, teardrop trailers, motor homes, and truck campers. Collectively, these vehicles are called recreational automobiles, or just plain RVs.

The different kinds of recreational vehicles share several characteristics, so how can one differentiate a travel trailer from the others? Unlike motor homes that are vehicles in themselves, travel trailers are not. Instead, travel trailers are designed to be towed by other vehicles by means of a bumper or trailer hitch. One would definitely make a mistake of travel trailer for other towable RVs because of their style and their size.

Travel trailer lengths usually range from twelve feet to about just forty feet. For those that are just about below eighteen feet in their length are often called small travel trailers. These travel trailers are usually the simplest and can accommodate about four people at most. Small travel trailers would not weigh more than 3,000 pounds and thus can be towed by a family car or a small pickup truck.

Travel trailers of eighteen to twenty-five feet in length are classified as mid-range travel trailers. These travel trailers are usually about 5,000 pounds in weight or more and are designed to be towed by V8-powered trucks and SUVs.

Those travel trailers that measure more than twenty-five feet in length are called large travel trailers. These are often the most luxurious, equipped with amenities that make them look like moving condominiums. Large travel trailers can measure up to 12,000 feet and usually need a heavy-duty SUV or a large truck to haul them. These RVs can also carry the greatest number of persons, ranging from eight to ten.

Travel trailer Parts

Thinking of traveling with a trailer may make you feel a bit excitement, however that level of excitement is only a part of the big picture.

In reality on a serious note, operating an automobile while hauling a heavy  duty travel trailer in tow has means that you have to be a responsible person who is also very pragmatic and cautious.

If you are not a responsible person then one way top prepare for all the mishaps and eventualities is being well prepare and having great knowledge of the equipment that you are travelling with in tow.

You also need to know how the all the moving parts function and how to take care of them, ideally by yourself in case you find yourself in such a situation.

Remember that travel trailers are made up of many moving parts that may malfunction at any point.

Some of these parts are the frame and various inside structures of the vehicle. These structures should however should not cause much problems.

Probably most travellers that you purchase will come furnished in full, with all you need.
The more serious travel trailer portions are the parts that join the trailer to the automobile. This would comprise the hitch whether it’s a weight carrying hitch or a weight distributing hitch. Along with the hitch, the travel trailer hitch assemblage would also be composed of a coupler, hitch ball, and security chains. In the case of weight distributing hitches, there are added constituents such as the spring bars, shank receiver and the sway controls.

Along with the trailer hitch there are supplementary vital parts that run from the trailer to the automobile including the braking system and the trailer’s electrical systems. In a travel trailer’s brake system a brake regulator that controls the various drum and disc brakes in the traveller is often mounted inside the automobile. Taking the electrical systems in account on the other hand composes of the wires that track from the vehicle to the trailer to regulate the various trailer lights and turn signals.

Other important parts are the wheels and tires.  Although their size does not make them seem too important for performance and safety.

To ensure that the critical parts are always in decent operational condition is probably one of the best ways to avoid numerous traffic accidents and impending mishaps. So basically any and every time one of these really important parts get damaged or starts to deteriorate, they are supposed to be replaced or fixed immediately, before you make an attempt to use the vehicle.

And remember if you are looking for enclosed trailers for sale in houston texas, utility trailers for sale in houston texas, or even horse trailers for sale in houston texas you can always come visit this website for more information.

just a side note: if you are any of these companies selling trailers in houston tx then contact us here

Here is very creative video that will further show the history of trailers

7 Companies In Houston Texas That Have Trailers For Sale

Welcome to Trailers for sale in Houston Texas. We are dedicated to providing the best information on trailers and more specifically those operating in Houston Texas.

Here is a list of companies that sell trailers in Houston Texas. Please check out all the options available as to ensure that you make the choice that is best suited for you in terms of price, location and opening hours.

1. CountrySide Trailer Sales

Country side trailer sales company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Country Side Trailer Sales offers new and used trailers for sale, trailer rentals, trailer parts and trailer storage.
Opening Hours: Monday – Friday 8:00am – 5:00pm
Saturday 9:00am – 1:00pm
Office : 281-353-7858
Fax : 281-288-5886
Email: countryside2006@sbcglobal.net

2. Texas Pride Trailers

texas pride trailers for sale in houston texas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Texas Pride Trailers are manufacturers of dump trailers, roll off trailers, equipment trailers, goosenecks and so much more.
Opening Hours: Mondays – Fridays 8:00am – 5:00pm
Saturday 7:00am – 12:00pm
Office : (936) 348-7552
Email : info@texaspridetrailers.com
Website : www.texaspridetrailers.com

 

3. Nationwide Trailers

trailers for sale in houston texas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nationwide Trailers is one of the biggest PJ Trailers distributors in Texas. There is nothing they won’t do for you.
Office: 291-931-3000
Toll Free: 866-931-3001
Fax : 281-931-3035
Email : info@nationwide-trailers.com

 

 

4. Big Tex Trailer World

trailers company in houston texas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Tex Trailer World is the number one in trailers sales in North America. They carry the largest selection of inventory and the best brands in the industry. Big Tex, CM Trailers, CM Truck Beds, S&H, Circle J, Texan Cargo, Pace American, Forest River, Haulmark, Master Tow Dollies, and Wells Cargo, just to name a few.

 

5. Cargo Country

Cargo Country trailer Company - houston texas

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you buy a trailer from Cargo Country, you know you are getting quality trailers. They believe in providing top-notch quality at rock bottom prices.
Office : 1 (800) 540-1975
Email : cargocountry@gmail.com

 

 

6. Trailer Shopper

Trailer Shopper trailers - houston

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trailer Shopper and Trailer Shopper Magazine is dedicated to buying and selling new and used trailers such as enclosed trailers, horse trailers, motorcycle trailers, cargo trailer and utility trailers.

Office : 608-237-7033

 

7: Texas Trailer Country

trailers for sale in houston texas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office : 281-452-2111

Promotional Videos Of Various Companies In Houston

Lightweight Travel Trailers for sale – Houston Texas

It is extremely good to have a lightweight travel trailer for the outside activities when you feel like you really do not want to stay indoors.

The trailers allow you to be on the road for extended periods of time which can be very good when you want to just get away from the hustle and bustle of the town and spend some time away in comfort without having to be at a stationary hotel or motel room.

Movement is completely in your hands as the trailer can be easily hauled with a truck or van.

The size, type, color and whatever else you want is totally and completely left up to your taste.

There a few things to keep in mind about the lightweight camper trailers though. The first thing is that  they are less expensive to upkeep and the cost for fuel is significantly lower as well.

One thing to remember though is that lightweight trailers are not as durable as other trailers of similar type which are heavier. The advantage that is gained through gas mileage is lost through durability.

There is an obvious trade off that is present with owning a lightweight trailer, but with good care and maintenance you can have one for a very long time.

Lightweight trailers come with some options albeit its disadvantages. There are many sizes and styles to choose among ranging from large space to smaller space.

The larger ones with big space can house furniture and still leave adequate walking and sitting space. Some trailers can even house a small but very useful kitchen inside. These small kitchenettes will make the trailer seem almost like a mini apartment. But please be ware because if you choose a lightweight trailer in order to save on gas mileage then if you put too much things inside you can find yourself back at square one.

Lightweight trailers are less expensive and have many advantages over heavier trailers however there is some trade-offs in between. The good about it all is that there are many models and sizes to suit your specific needs.